University Hospital Galway

  • University Hospital Galway is reminding the public that visitor restrictions continue on St. Dominic's ward due to a number of confirmed cases of Influenza (flu). In order to assist staff in curtailing the spread of the flu virus, it says its imperative that only essential visiting takes place at this time in consultation with nurse management on the ward.

    Infection control procedures are in place on the affected ward and will remain in place until further notice.

    There continue to be cases of flu in the community and anyone who is suffering from symptoms of the flu are asked not visit patients in the hospital to avoid spreading the virus to sick vulnerable patients.

  • There are 21 patients on trolleys today at University Hospital Galway.

    That’s according to the latest trolley watch from the INMO.

    16 patients are waiting for admission to a bed today at Mayo University Hospital while there are nine patients on trolleys today at Sligo University Hospital.

  • The number of patients on hospital trolleys has increased by 50 since yesterday.

    According to the Irish Nurses & Midwives Organisation, there are 563 patients on hospital trolleys across the country today - up from 513 yesterday.

    Limerick University Hospital is again the most overcrowded with 64 patients waiting for a bed, followed by Galway and Cork University Hospitals - both with 44 patients on trolleys.

    There are 33 patients waiting for a bed today at Sligo University Hospital and 7 at Mayo University Hospital.

    Meanwhile the number of patients taking up beds on a long-term basis at Galway University Hospital who no longer need that level of medical care needs to be tackled, according to a local Councillor.

    There are currently 37 patients at University Hospital Galway and Merlin Park Hospital who have been there for over two months - but only 14 of these are receiving active medical care.

    Galway-based Fianna Fail Councillor Donagh Killilea questioned HSE management on the issue of bed-blockers at yesterday's meeting of the HSE West Regional Forum.

    Councillor Killilea says the figure provided by the HSE include long-term care applicants waiting to move to other health facilities, as well as homeless people.

    He believes the HSE and Galway City Council can do more to find alternative accommodation for these patients, and free up beds for patients on trolleys.

  • 217 patients are being treated on trolleys at hospitals across the country.

     

    The worst affected facility is University Hospital Limerick, where there are 49 people awaiting beds.

     

    That's followed by 18 at Portiuncula Hospital, 16 at Mayo University Hospital and  3 at University Hospital Galway across the Midwest according to the INMO.

     

    There are no patients on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital this morning.

  • 455 people are being treated on trolleys at hospitals across the country.

    University Hospital Limerick is the worst affected facility with 55 people without beds.

    That's followed by 53 at Cork University Hospital and 39 at University Hospital Galway, according to figures from the INMO.

    Elsewhere, in this region there are 14 patients on trolleys at Mayo University Hospital and two each on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital and Portiuncula Hospital in Ballinasloe.

  • University Hospital Galway has the highest number of patients on trolleys today according to the Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation.

    There are 43 patients waiting for a hospital bed at the Galway facility today, with the same number on trolleys at Cork University Hospital.

    Elsewhere there are 16 patients on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital, 12 at Mayo University Hospital and 7 at Portiuncula Hospital in Ballinasloe.

    Nationally there are 465 patients waiting on a trolley for a hospital bed today.

  • There are 44 patients on trolleys at University Hospital Galway today.

    That is the third highest figure in the country.

    University Hospital Limerick has 50 patients on trolleys snad Cork University Hospital 45.

    Elsewhere there are 28 patients on hospital trolleys at Sligo University Hospital today and 4 at Mayo University Hospital.

    Nationally there are 443 patients on hospital trolleys today.

     

     

     

  • University Hospital Galway has the highest number of patients on trolleys in the country this afternoon – with 47 people waiting on a hospital bed.

    That’s the highest in the country, along with Cork University Hospital, where there are also 47 patients on trolleys.

    There are 480 patients on trolleys nationwide this afternoon – 23 of those at Sligo University Hospital, 7 at Mayo University Hospital and 6 at Portiuncula Hospital in Ballinasloe.

  • There are 48 patients on trolleys today at University Hospital Galway – the third highest figure in the country.

    According to the Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation there are 480 patients on trolleys nationwide – with 50 waiting for a bed in both Cork University Hospital and University Hospital Limerick.

    Elsewhere there 26 patients on trolleys at Mayo University Hospital, 29 at Sligo University Hospital and 5 at Portiuncula Hospital in Ballinasloe.

  • There are 53 patients on trolleys at University Hospital Galway this afternoon, the second highest figure in the country.

    The highest number of patients on trolleys is at Cork University Hospital today, with the figure standing at 54.

    Nationally there are 511 patients on trolleys this afternoon.

    There are 30 patients on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital, 24 at Mayo University Hospital and none at Portiuncla Hospital in Ballinasloe.

  • Over 500 people are waiting on trolleys at hospitals across the country today.

    The INMO says 504 people are without beds, 66 of those are at University Hospital Limerick.

    That's followed by 55 at University Hospital Galway and 43 at University Hospital Waterford.

    Elsewhere, in this region there are eleven patients on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital, three patients at Portiuncula Hospital in Ballinasloe and two people waiting for admission to a bed today at Mayo University Hospital.

  • The number of patients on hospital trolleys across the country has increased significantly this week, compared to last week.

    Today, there are 565 patients waiting for a bed - with 583 on trolleys yesterday and 565 on Monday.

    Last week's trolley figures were between 300 and 400.

    The INMO figures show Galway University Hospital is the third most-overcrowded today with 44 patients on trolleys, while there are 22 waiting for a bed at Sligo University Hospital and 13 at Mayo University Hospital.

    The ongoing overcrowding and the pressure this is putting on nursing staff are among the reasons INMO members are taking strike action later this month.

    Nurses will go on a 24-hour strike on Wednesday 30th January - three weeks from today - with 5 further days of strike action planned for February.

    The union says members are fed up dealing with low pay and poor working conditions.

    However, the Irish Patients Association says patients lives are at risk if the proposed strike by nurses goes ahead at the end of the month.

  • There are 60 patients on trolleys today at University Hospital Galway which is the second highest in the country.

    That’s according to the latest trolley watch from the INMO which shows there are 531 waiting for admission to a bed nationally.

    Meanwhile, there are 31 patients on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital, twelve at Mayo University Hospital and nine patients on trolleys at Portiuncula Hospital in Ballinasloe.

  • University Hospital Galway was the third most-overcrowded in the country during last month, according to new figures from the INMO.

    During the month of February, 805 patients were treated on trolleys at the Galway hospital - with Limerick and Cork University Hospitals being the most overcrowded.

    The figures show over 10,000 admitted patients were left on trolleys across the country during February - an increase of 23% on February 2019.

    At Mayo University Hospital, 317 were on trolleys during last month - up from 171 in the same month last year.

    290 patients were treated on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital - which was down on the figure for Feb 2019 - while the figure at Portiuncla Hospital was much the same.

    The Irish Nurses & Midwives Organisation says the long-running trolley crisis has to be the top priority in talks on forming a new Government.

    The INMO says their members are forced to provide care in appalling conditions, while qualified healthcare staff are queueing ujp to work, but hospitals are unable to hire them.

    The union is calling for the recruitment embargo to be lifted - whatever the make up of the next Government.

     

  • A Coast Guard helicopter has airlifted a diver today to Galway University Hospital.

    The diver is understood to have been diving at the wreck of the Lusitania about 12 miles off the Old head of Kinsale, and suffered a diving illness.

    The diver was recovered from the sea by Naval Ship the LE George Bernard Shaw and received initial medical attention at Cork University Hospital before being transferred to the recompression facility at University Hospital Galway.

  • The operators of the car-park at University Hospital Galway should be more lenient, in cases where people parked in a hurry to get a loved one into hospital and may not have money with them to pay the parking charges.

    That's according to Galway City Councillor Padraig Conneely who raised the matter at this week's HSE Regional Forum meeting in Merlin Park Hospital.

    It emerged at the meeting that revenue from car-parking charges was worth a net €1.3 million euro to Galway University Hospital in 2016.

    Councillor Conneely outlined two issues in relation to parking at the hospital - firstly he outlined the difficulties people have in getting a parking space, and secondly, he gave examples of when people may not have money with them to pay the fees, if they rushed to the hospital in an emergency situation.

    The meeting was told that concessions are available in some circumstances, but Councillor Conneely says the general public are not aware of these concessions.

  • A Galway City Councillor has expressed concerns about the high level of people presenting at the Emergency Department of Galway University Hospital with alcohol-related conditions.

    The issue was raised at this week's meeting of the HSE Regional Forum, where FG Councillor Padraig Conneely asked management for a breakdown of the figures in relation to those attending the Emergency Department - particularly at weekends and during festivals - with alcohol-related problems.

    Councillor Conneely was told those statistics are not available, but he says national and international trends would indicate that significant resources in Emergency Departments are being used to treat people who have over-indulged.

  • The Taoiseach has confirmed that a Garda investigation is under way into the alleged drunken assault of a 74-year-old woman on a trolley in University Hospital Galway who was subsequently found on the floor “screaming in pain” with a broken hip.

    Independent Galway TD Catherine Connolly raised the case in the Dáil yesterday, saying the Government had been “put on notice repeatedly about the state of the Galway hospital”.

    According to the Irish Times, Deputy Connolly said the 74-year old woman was “allegedly assaulted by somebody who was drunk and roaming about with a carer but not being properly cared for”, and alleged that there was no security at the scene.

    The elderly woman had spent 72 hours on a trolley, having been admitted from another hospital with a suspected infection. She was found “screaming in pain” on the floor.

    Her family, with no medical training, diagnosed that her hip was broken, but said  “she was taken back to a bed or trolley and left for five solid hours without having an X-ray or pain relief”.

    The hospital only addressed the family’s concerns after they had made a formal complaint. They received a phone call to say an investigation was ongoing, but got no further information.

    Taoiseach Leo Varadker confirmed that a Garda inquiry is under way, along with another investigation by the hospital authorities.

    The Taoiseach also pointed out that a new emergency department is being planned for University Hospital Gaway, which he accepted was long-overdue.

     

  • A girl with cerebral palsy would probably not have suffered any, or any severe, brain injury if she had been delivered ten minutes earlier at University Hospital Galway, it was claimed in the High Court yesterday.

    Today’s Irish Independent reports that Faye Walsh, 2who is not seven, has through her mother Martina of Letterfrack in Co Galway, sued the HSE and two consultant obstetricians alleging negligence and breach of agreement in relation to the management and circumstances of her birth at University Hospital Galway on August 15th 2011.

    The defendants deny the claims against them in proceedings before Mr Justice David Keane.

    The case is expected to last a number of weeks.

     

  • Three separate investigations are underway into the circumstances surrounding the death of a pensioner at University Hospital Galway.

    The pensioner broke her hip in an alleged assault by an ‘aggressive’ patient in the Emergency Department.

    The Connacht Tribune reports that authorities at the hospital and Gardaí have launched separate investigations into the death of the 74-year-old woman.

    The woman endured an ordeal in the Emergency Department of the public hospital in the days leading up to her passing in late September.