public toilets

  • Anyone hoping to spend a penney to use a public toilet in Ballina has a long wait.
    The Director of Services for MCC Tom Gilligan told councillors in the BMD area yesterday that a public toilet on a street in the town does not make economic sense, due to the cost of the facility and would not bring an extra tourist to Ballina.

    FG Cllr John O’Hara disagrees- and argued that it’s a basic facility for people doing their shopping in the town.

    He asked at least for signs to be erected at public buildings in the town indicating toilet facilities, if available.

    Afterwards Cllr O'Hara told Midwest News the response by the council is not good enough.

  • Passengers on the Westport to Dublin train had to stand in the toilet area due to the overcrowded conditions on the train, that’s according to Cathaoirleach of Mayo County Council, Brendan Mulroy.

     

    The Cathaoirleach has again called on Irish Rail to add additional carriages and trains on the Westport route to Dublin.

     

    With people standing in the aisles, in between carriages and in the toilets, the Cathaoirleach stated it wasn’t possible for a ticket collector to walk up the aisles on Sunday.

  • The public toilets at the carpark in Murrisk , at the base of Croagh Patrick are a disgrace, according to local Independent councillor Christy Hyland.

    The councillor raised his concerns over the facility at the monthly meeting of West Mayo Municipal District.

    He called on the council to update the facilities, describing the present building as something like you would see in a prison back in the 1960s.

    In addition councillor Hyland called for a counter system, similar to that operated by Mayo county council on Croagh Patrick, be installed at the Famine Monument across the road from the Murrisk carpark, in an attempt to quantify the number of visitors to the site.

    Councillor Hyland told Midwest News today that  the present public toilet facility at Croagh Patrick is not acceptable considering up to 120,000 people climb the holy mountain annually.