Budget 2021

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    In terms of social welfare, rates are to be maintained in 2021.

    Child benefit increases by 5 euro for children over 12, and €2 for children under 12.

    The Carers Support grant is up by €150 to €1850 per year.

    There's a €5 increase in the living alone allowance, and the fuel allowance is up €3.50 a week to €28.

    The Christmas bonus is to be paid to those on the Pandemic Unemployment Payment , while self employed people on the PUP can take up some freelance work and not lose their benefit

    The planned pension age increase in Jan 2021 WON'T proceed.

     

     

     

  • Drivers will pay an average of two euro more to fill their car with petrol or diesel from tomorrow due to the carbon tax hike, according to the Society of the Irish Motor Industry.

    Brian Cooke, Director General of SIMI, says drivers will be paying more for petrol and diesel from midnight:

  • The cost of cigarettes and motor fuel increased overnight as a result of Budget 2021.

    50 cent has been added to the cost of a box of cigarettes, with other increases on related products.

    AA Ireland says the carbon tax increase will only push up living costs for those dependent on cars and does nothing for the environment.

    Motorists will pay around two cent more for a litre of petrol and two and a half cent for a litre of diesel.

    Conor Faughnan, from AA Ireland, says this will particularly hurt those living in isolated parts of the country:

  • The Government is finalising Budget 2021 this weekend.

    It's expected to be the largest budget package in this history of the State.

    Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe revealed on Friday that there will be a 21 billion euro budget deficit this year - a huge sum but considerably less than had been feared.

    Details of the new spending measures are emerging ahead of the big reveal on Tuesday.

    The Business Post reports that Budget 2021 will see the biggest ever increase in health spending.

    It's due to increase by 4 billion with much going to cover Covid-19 costs, but it will help fund a significant expansion in capacity, including 1,285 new acute beds.

    The paper also says there will be a 150 million euro increase in funding for home care packages and up to 300 new hospital consultants will be recruited on public only contracts.

    Meanwhile, a Christmas bonus for people getting the pandemic unemployment payment is on the cards according to the Sunday Times.

    The paper reports that a new scheme to allow the self-employed to earn up to 480 euro a month and still get the PUP will also be included in Tuesday’s budget.

  • The Finance Minister has unveiled a 17.7 billion euro budget package.

    Minister Paschal Donohoe said the budget has been framed with both Covid and Brexit in mind.

    There will be a 3.4 billion euro recovery fund aimed at increasing employment. 

    The fund will be targeted to boost domestic demand.

    As part of the stimulus package, the VAT rate for hospitality will be reduced to 9% from November 1st.

    The Temporary Wage Subsidy Scheme or a similar scheme will remain in place to the end of next year.

    The waiver on commercial rates will be extended for the final quarter of this year.

    There will be a new COVID restrictions support scheme to provide targeted support for businesses that have temporarily closed because of the pandemic

    Minister Donohue explained that scheme will operate when level three or higher is in place.

    Elsewhere, carbon tax will increase by 7.50 a tonne from midnight, but there will be no broad changes to income tax credits or tax bands.

    The Minister has announced some changes to Vehicle registration tax aimed at encouraging people to buy low emission cars.

    Cigarettes are to go up by 50 cent - bringing the average cost of a packet of 20 to fourteen euro.

    An extra €4 billion has been allocated for the health service next year, and 5 million extra homecare hours have been announced.

    €100 million has been announced for new disability measures.