University Hospital Galway

  • University Hospital Galway is reminding the public that visitor restrictions continue on St. Dominic's ward due to a number of confirmed cases of Influenza (flu). In order to assist staff in curtailing the spread of the flu virus, it says its imperative that only essential visiting takes place at this time in consultation with nurse management on the ward.

    Infection control procedures are in place on the affected ward and will remain in place until further notice.

    There continue to be cases of flu in the community and anyone who is suffering from symptoms of the flu are asked not visit patients in the hospital to avoid spreading the virus to sick vulnerable patients.

  • There are 21 patients on trolleys today at University Hospital Galway.

    That’s according to the latest trolley watch from the INMO.

    16 patients are waiting for admission to a bed today at Mayo University Hospital while there are nine patients on trolleys today at Sligo University Hospital.

  • The number of patients on hospital trolleys has increased by 50 since yesterday.

    According to the Irish Nurses & Midwives Organisation, there are 563 patients on hospital trolleys across the country today - up from 513 yesterday.

    Limerick University Hospital is again the most overcrowded with 64 patients waiting for a bed, followed by Galway and Cork University Hospitals - both with 44 patients on trolleys.

    There are 33 patients waiting for a bed today at Sligo University Hospital and 7 at Mayo University Hospital.

    Meanwhile the number of patients taking up beds on a long-term basis at Galway University Hospital who no longer need that level of medical care needs to be tackled, according to a local Councillor.

    There are currently 37 patients at University Hospital Galway and Merlin Park Hospital who have been there for over two months - but only 14 of these are receiving active medical care.

    Galway-based Fianna Fail Councillor Donagh Killilea questioned HSE management on the issue of bed-blockers at yesterday's meeting of the HSE West Regional Forum.

    Councillor Killilea says the figure provided by the HSE include long-term care applicants waiting to move to other health facilities, as well as homeless people.

    He believes the HSE and Galway City Council can do more to find alternative accommodation for these patients, and free up beds for patients on trolleys.

  • University Hospital Galway has the highest number of patients on trolleys today according to the Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation.

    There are 43 patients waiting for a hospital bed at the Galway facility today, with the same number on trolleys at Cork University Hospital.

    Elsewhere there are 16 patients on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital, 12 at Mayo University Hospital and 7 at Portiuncula Hospital in Ballinasloe.

    Nationally there are 465 patients waiting on a trolley for a hospital bed today.

  • There are 44 patients on trolleys at University Hospital Galway today.

    That is the third highest figure in the country.

    University Hospital Limerick has 50 patients on trolleys snad Cork University Hospital 45.

    Elsewhere there are 28 patients on hospital trolleys at Sligo University Hospital today and 4 at Mayo University Hospital.

    Nationally there are 443 patients on hospital trolleys today.

     

     

     

  • University Hospital Galway has the highest number of patients on trolleys in the country this afternoon – with 47 people waiting on a hospital bed.

    That’s the highest in the country, along with Cork University Hospital, where there are also 47 patients on trolleys.

    There are 480 patients on trolleys nationwide this afternoon – 23 of those at Sligo University Hospital, 7 at Mayo University Hospital and 6 at Portiuncula Hospital in Ballinasloe.

  • There are 48 patients on trolleys today at University Hospital Galway – the third highest figure in the country.

    According to the Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation there are 480 patients on trolleys nationwide – with 50 waiting for a bed in both Cork University Hospital and University Hospital Limerick.

    Elsewhere there 26 patients on trolleys at Mayo University Hospital, 29 at Sligo University Hospital and 5 at Portiuncula Hospital in Ballinasloe.

  • There are 53 patients on trolleys at University Hospital Galway this afternoon, the second highest figure in the country.

    The highest number of patients on trolleys is at Cork University Hospital today, with the figure standing at 54.

    Nationally there are 511 patients on trolleys this afternoon.

    There are 30 patients on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital, 24 at Mayo University Hospital and none at Portiuncla Hospital in Ballinasloe.

  • The number of patients on hospital trolleys across the country has increased significantly this week, compared to last week.

    Today, there are 565 patients waiting for a bed - with 583 on trolleys yesterday and 565 on Monday.

    Last week's trolley figures were between 300 and 400.

    The INMO figures show Galway University Hospital is the third most-overcrowded today with 44 patients on trolleys, while there are 22 waiting for a bed at Sligo University Hospital and 13 at Mayo University Hospital.

    The ongoing overcrowding and the pressure this is putting on nursing staff are among the reasons INMO members are taking strike action later this month.

    Nurses will go on a 24-hour strike on Wednesday 30th January - three weeks from today - with 5 further days of strike action planned for February.

    The union says members are fed up dealing with low pay and poor working conditions.

    However, the Irish Patients Association says patients lives are at risk if the proposed strike by nurses goes ahead at the end of the month.

  • There are 60 patients on trolleys today at University Hospital Galway which is the second highest in the country.

    That’s according to the latest trolley watch from the INMO which shows there are 531 waiting for admission to a bed nationally.

    Meanwhile, there are 31 patients on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital, twelve at Mayo University Hospital and nine patients on trolleys at Portiuncula Hospital in Ballinasloe.

  • The operators of the car-park at University Hospital Galway should be more lenient, in cases where people parked in a hurry to get a loved one into hospital and may not have money with them to pay the parking charges.

    That's according to Galway City Councillor Padraig Conneely who raised the matter at this week's HSE Regional Forum meeting in Merlin Park Hospital.

    It emerged at the meeting that revenue from car-parking charges was worth a net €1.3 million euro to Galway University Hospital in 2016.

    Councillor Conneely outlined two issues in relation to parking at the hospital - firstly he outlined the difficulties people have in getting a parking space, and secondly, he gave examples of when people may not have money with them to pay the fees, if they rushed to the hospital in an emergency situation.

    The meeting was told that concessions are available in some circumstances, but Councillor Conneely says the general public are not aware of these concessions.

  • A Galway City Councillor has expressed concerns about the high level of people presenting at the Emergency Department of Galway University Hospital with alcohol-related conditions.

    The issue was raised at this week's meeting of the HSE Regional Forum, where FG Councillor Padraig Conneely asked management for a breakdown of the figures in relation to those attending the Emergency Department - particularly at weekends and during festivals - with alcohol-related problems.

    Councillor Conneely was told those statistics are not available, but he says national and international trends would indicate that significant resources in Emergency Departments are being used to treat people who have over-indulged.

  • A girl with cerebral palsy would probably not have suffered any, or any severe, brain injury if she had been delivered ten minutes earlier at University Hospital Galway, it was claimed in the High Court yesterday.

    Today’s Irish Independent reports that Faye Walsh, 2who is not seven, has through her mother Martina of Letterfrack in Co Galway, sued the HSE and two consultant obstetricians alleging negligence and breach of agreement in relation to the management and circumstances of her birth at University Hospital Galway on August 15th 2011.

    The defendants deny the claims against them in proceedings before Mr Justice David Keane.

    The case is expected to last a number of weeks.

     

  • A man has died after being taken from the water at Galway city docks early this morning.

    Gardaí, emergency services and the RNLI lifeboat attended the scene at 5.45 am. 

    The RNLI lifeboat crew was tasked to take the man's body from the water, he was brought to University Hospital Galway where he was pronounced dead.

    Gardaí say there will be a post-mortem examination later today and they are in the process of trying to identify the man.

  • Government Chief Whip, Fine Gael TD for Galway West  Sean Kyne  has  called for planning permission for the new Emergency Department of University Hospital Galway to be sought without delay. The Minister expressed concerns regarding a decision to postpone seeking planning until after the completion of what’s termed an “options appraisal” report. 
    He says he is extremely concerned by the delay in the submission of a planning application by the Saolta Hospital Group. 

    The Minister’s call comes after after Saolta officials decided to delay lodging the planning application in order to carry out an appraisal which is due to be completed by the end of February, and  will evaluate the future use of both the Merlin Park and UHG sites.

    Minister Kyne states that “it is unacceptable and unthinkable that planning permission for the new ED, the design of which is finalised, has not yet been submitted and is being held up by a consultant’s report on healthcare facilities in Galway”. 

    “The current Emergency Department is not fit for purpose”, he says. “ It is neither an appropriate facility for the patients or the staff and was described as not fit for purpose by former Taoiseach, Enda Kenny”.

     Minister Kyne told Midwest News that he knows that Taoiseach Leo Varadkar and the Minister for Health Simon Harris are both of the same view and are anxious to make progress on the project. 

    “The issue of the proposed elective hospital in Merlin Park is a completely separate issue. The options appraisal does not impact on the need for a new emergency department, which is universally accepted. In the interests of patients across the West and of healthcare staff the planning application for the new Emergency Department must be submitted without delay”, he concluded. 

  • A motorcyclist was airlifted to hospital after his bike collided with a bridge on the Partry to Westport road on Saturday evening.

    The single vehicle impact occurred at Derrin Bridge.

    The injured male was flown to University Hospital Galway where he is said to be making a good recovery.

  • Nearly 8,000 admitted patients were forced to wait on trolleys and chairs in our hospitals during September.

    The figures released today by the INMO showed that 7,765 admitted patients were treated without hospital beds last month.

    University Hospital Galway was among the worst affected hospitals with 609 patients on trolleys for the month of September.

    INMO Industrial Relations Officer for the Western Region Anne Burke says nearly 8,000 people on trolleys should be regarded as a national crisis.

    She says their members are telling them they can’t go on with this number of unfilled vacancies and it’s not safe for patients or staff.

  • Nurses and midwives are gathering in protest at hospitals across the country, demanding the HSE make plans for the expected winter increase in patients.

    INMO figures show that August was the worst on record for overcrowding, with hundreds of vacant nursing posts in emergency departments and wards across Ireland.

    The INMO revealed last week that the HSE still does not have a plan to recruit extra staff or reduce services to cope with the demand.

    Nurses and midwives are protesting this lunchtime at the Main Entrance of University Hospital Galway.

  • People don't have an 'absolute right' to have their name spelled with a “fada”, according to the data watchdog.

    A man who was being treated for cancer at University Hospital Galway had complained to the Data Protection Commission after the hospital said it was unable  to include the “fada” on his name.

    The DPC found that an individual doesn't have an 'absolute right' to have their records rectified and that it depends on each individual case.

    According to the Irish Times ,Ciarán Ó Cofaigh (51), alleges the Health Service Executive (HSE) was in breach of EU rules when the hospital told him its computer software does not allow for “fadas”.

    The HSE admits its systems in “various” locations do not accept the accent, which it acknowledges is an integral component of the Ireland’s first official language and necessary to properly spell Irish names.

    After an eight-month investigation into the complaint, the commission has ruled an individual’s right to have their records rectified “is not an absolute right” and “depends on the circumstances in each individual case”.

    It recommended the HSE keep Mr Ó Cofaigh updated about the ability of its systems to accept fadas in the future and that it put a note on his hard-copy file to say he disputes the accuracy of his name on existing records.

  • Plans are being finalised for a new bus service, which will transport cancer patients from Co Mayo to and from University Hospital Galway for radiotherapy treatment on a weekly basis.

    Each year, about 250 patients from Mayo travel to UHG for radiotherapy, and many of these people opt to stay over the Inis Aoibhinn residential facility on the grounds of the hospital from Monday to Friday, only returning home at weekend during their 6-8 week treatment.

    Currently, bus services operate from Donegal, Sligo and Co Galway to the hospital, but no such service exists for the people of Mayo.

    To address this need, Cancer Care West has recently bought a new 29-seater bus, which will transport patients staying over in Inis Aoibhinn.

    It's hoped the bus service will start in mid-February, commencing in Belmullet and travelling through 10 or 12 towns and villages en route to Galway University Hospital.

    A fundraising drive is now underway to meet the costs of the new bus service.

     

    Cancer Care West in Galway can be contacted on 091 - 545 000 or by visiting www.cancercarewest.ie